Tablet audits begin

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By Brett Alsop
Eagle Editorial Board

 

Tablets have taken the school by storm. But, with this innovation comes additional responsibility for students. Tablets are not meant for personal entertainment and inappropriate use. In order to deter these issues, the administration has developed a tablet auditing program.

“The audits will start soon, within the next couple of weeks,” Dean of Students Tim Clarkson said.

This program will be similar to the drug testing system used at St. Thomas.

“The audits are completely random,” Clarkson said. “They will be computer generated just like the drug tests. The computer spits out random numbers that are assigned to students and those students are then taken out of class.”

Students do not have to worry about being targeted for audits because they are completely random.

In regards to punishments after audits, there have been rumors that need to be squashed. A rumor has been going around that a student received 18 detentions for the 18 games he had on his tablet.

“I am at fault for not doing my best to squash the rumor of the 18 detentions for 18 games,” Clarkson said. “Only because I knew it would have the desired effect.”

Clarkson assures that the punishments for having inappropriate content on tablet will be fair. No student will receive an unjust punishment for having just games. However, if something of a highly inappropriate nature comes up, such as pornography or drug and alcohol content, the punishments will be much more severe.

“The punishments will fit the crime,” Clarkson said.

There will also be different types of audits. The computer will randomly generate a certain amount of names for each type of audit, and there will be different audits for different days.

One type of audit may involve running a report on student tablets to determine what apps are installed. A more hands-on style audit, conducted by the information technology department with the dean of students, will investigate tablet contents for questionable content.

“I feel like the audits are a good idea,” junior Nicholas Wong said, “because students can easily get distracted during class and it’s good that the administration is watching out for that.”

A misconception among students is that the school is out to catch students; however this is not the case. The concerns are that students are on task, safe from explicit material, and the tablets are benefiting the students’ education.

However after the first day of auditing on September 27 these motives are starting to be questioned. Several students had their tablets audited. The IT department searched tablets for inappropriate pictures and games. They also scanned search history to make sure no inappropriate sites were being viewed. The audits were a success but the “random” aspect of auditing was not really apparent.

Several students had their tablets audited on Sept. 27. The IT department searched tablets for inappropriate pictures and games. They also scanned search history to make sure no inappropriate sites were being viewed. The audits were a success but the “random” aspect of auditing was not very apparent.

“Mr. Clarkson came in my class and pulled me out,” junior Sam Thurston said. “But then he turned to [physics teacher Mike] Lynch and asked if there was anyone in the class who played games a lot and needed to have their tablet looked at.”

There are good intentions behind these audits. Students do not need to be wasting class time playing games instead of learning, and preserving the random aspect of audits is of importance.

 

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