New print system solves problems but creates others

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By Max Machiorlette
Eagle Staff

The printing cards have been a continuous struggle for students.

From last year’s paper printing cards to this years online print card system, the system seems to be

heading in the right direction.

Although the new printing card standards seem stout, the new implemented system does have its

positives.

Last year, students had to carry around a paper print card and have it hole punched every time they

printed a paper in the LRC.

The cost was 10 cents per black and white, and 30 cents for colored printing. Students would

frequently forget or misplace their card, causing more confusion and work for the students and

administration.

It costs the school $17,000 annually to finance the printing around the school, more than the tuition

for students.

A new, easier and manageable system was needed.

“Papercut” is the name of this new system that can be accessed from anywhere on campus.

Although the new system to print seems to be extremely overpriced since cards cost $25 instead of

$2, the ability to print on campus is worth the cost.

Papercut has a secured login that deducts money from a student’s account automatically. Students

can now use credit cards or pay with cash in the business office to print materials.

It is easy to use and you do not have to worry about holding onto your old printing cards anymore.

To start a printing account, students will have to make a deposit of $25.

However, the initial payment should not be a reason to get a 0 on an assignment.

Last year’s printing was inefficient and tough to manage.

While Papercut does seem like an overpriced program, its benefits do outweigh the steep up-front

cost since it will last a lot longer than the $2 paper card.

Paper cut lets students print and pay fast, allowing students to get work done promptly.

While the intial purchase cost is high, the benefits are a nice progression forward from the older

system.

The complications with printing cards have declined substantially.

 

 

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