‘Conversations That Count’ sparks much needed discussion among parents

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By Michael PizzitolaConversation that Count 10-28-14 GS (4)
Eagle Editorial Board

Partying, drinking alcohol and experimenting

with drugs are some of the many alluring

temptations that high school teens have to

constantly face.

While many of these things can appear to be the

“cool thing to do,” they ultimately can pose problems for both students and parents alike.

Of the tempting behaviors high school presents, underage drinking is one of the most prevalent.

Minors often drink because they think its cool or helps them get girls. They often fail to drink only in

moderation and often wind up binge drinking.

Binge drinking is dangerous and can be a huge problem for several reasons.

First and foremost, the teenage brain is still developing. Binge drinking damages this development

and can lead to future problems.

Additionally, after having more than five drinks in a night, chances are one is not in a capacity to

make good, safe decisions. This lack of clear judgement can lead to drinking and driving or further

drinking which can lead to alcohol poisoning and even death.

In an effort to combat these high-risk behaviors, St. Thomas held its annual “Conversations that

Count” on October 28 and 29.

This event sought to offer a way for both parents and students to educate themselves about high risk

behaviors and how to avoid them.

On the first night, freshmen students and parents were paired with various senior mentors. Here all

the parties involved gained helpful insight from responsible seniors who have been around the high

school scene for almost four years now.

This is a great way to conduct the event because freshmen and other underclassman often look up to

the seniors and see them as role models whom they want to imitate and be like.

Therefore, a senior telling a younger student that he should stay away from drinking or other

problematic behaviors will be a lot more effective and well received than if it were said by parents or

administrators.

 

 

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