Stranger Things triggers nostalgia, refines Netflix catalogue

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“Stranger Things” is different, or rather, strange.

A new entry to the, so far, widely acclaimed Netflix-exclusive catalog, “Stranger Things” is a supernatural horror television series dipped in nostalgia and crafted with care. In the context of the Netflix-exclusive catalog, “Stranger Things” is the best series it has to offer even when put against giants like House of Cards or Narcos.

“Stranger Things” is set in a small town in Indiana in 1983 and loosely follows the Byers family as they attempt to find their missing member, Will. The show places heavy emphasis on the un-nuclear family as the two members, mother Joyce and and brother Jonathan, undergo great turmoil.

But the small family is not alone in their search. The supporting cast is also fantastic. David Harbour does a great job portraying Hopper, the cop who will jump through any hoops to get the case solved. Although at first, Hopper is portrayed as a lazy donut-cop, that quickly changes as he begins to realize the severity of the situation.

Will's group of friends embody that clique of nerdy kids who just hang out together all the time, playing Dungeons and Dragons in a basement in one moment while battling a frightening Lovecraftian monster in another.
Will’s group of friends embody that clique of nerdy kids who just hang out together all the time, playing Dungeons and Dragons in a basement in one moment while battling a frightening Lovecraftian monster in another.

 

But Will is not the only Byers to be in a clique. His older brother, Jonathan, also has a group of friends that help him in his quest to find his brother. Jonathan and his group of companions offer a welcome contrast between how children and teenagers deal with problems.

Jonathan and his group of companions offer a welcome contrast between how children and teenagers solve problems.
Jonathan and his group of companions offer a welcome contrast between how children and teenagers solve problems.

In a world filled to the brim with movies and shows that embellish themselves under the label of “realistic,” it’s delightful to see a show like “Stranger Things” – delving into heroes, villains, and monsters – enter the fray. Another great inclusion to the series is the mysterious Eleven, a girl who escapes from a government facility with supernatural powers. She befriends Will’s group of friends and shenanigans ensue.

Perhaps the only negative critique I can give about “Stranger Things” is that the supernatural elements are not entirely explained in full. But perhaps that’s the point; for a show to explain its mythology would make it “realistic” and maybe that’s what “Stranger Things” is trying to drive away from. The monsters never need to be explained. All we need to know is that they are just “there” and they have to be dealt with.

The ending to the season was a little weak, but sometimes, the journey is so fun that when you reach the destination you cannot help but feel a little let-down.

Other than that, “Stranger Things” is terrifyingly terrific and engrossing. It makes you want to watch one episode after another and, before you know it, you just finished an 8-hour binge.

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Justin is a part-time senior at St. Thomas High School and a full-time Online Editor-in-Chief for The Eagle. He made the website that you are looking through right now, and designs the layouts for all the articles on it. Justin participates in Speech & Debate, the Eagle Broadcast Network, Eagle Ambassadors, Model UN, Student Council, Political Awareness Club, and Columbian Squires. Safe to say that he plays a huge role in your life in someway.

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